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A Shoe for Brazil asserted the social and economic importance of the national product

The footwear industry is traditional and important for the Brazilian economy. It directly creates over 270 thousand jobs and manufactures over 900 million pairs of shoes every year (4th largest on the planet). On the last days of August, it promoted the movement Um Sapato pelo Brasil [A Shoe for Brazil]. During the period, 150 major Brazilian footwear brands carried out synchronized actions on their social networks aiming to make society aware of the importance of the industry for the country and mainly of the importance of purchasing shoes manufactured in Brazil, which result in employment, income, and development.

According to a report prepared by the Brazilian Footwear Industries Association (Abicalçados), more than 4 million impressions, 325 thousand likes, and 11 thousand comments are estimated on the social networks of participating brands between August 24 and 27. "The campaign was very successful; it brought together competitors for the same cause, reaching more than 3.5 million users on social networks. The feedbacks were very positive and I believe that an important seed has been planted in this historic moment: union,” says the coordinator of Abicalçados' Image Promotion Unit, Alice Rodrigues. She emphasized that the brands themselves started the movement and they also granted discounts of up to 20% for products purchased from their e-commerce outlets.

One of the participating brands was the company Bischoff Group, manufacturer of shoes for the brands Jorge Bischoff and Loucos & Santos. The company's branding and business director, Natália Bischoff, points out that the initiative was very meaningful for the valuation of Brazilian shoes. "It was only the first step. This movement must continue, due to the social and economic strength of the industry," she highlights. According to her, it is increasingly important to create joint actions that strengthen the brand “shoe from Brazil”, which is recognized worldwide for its quality, comfort, and design.

The manufacturer of children's shoes Bibi joined the campaign to underline the strength of the sector through union, which is even more necessary in tumultuous moments like the one we have been going through. According to the company's brand and retail director, Camila Kohlrausch, by participating in the initiative, Bibi sought to promote integration to point out the social gains the footwear activity provides, which should likely help “alleviate the crisis caused by the pandemic.”

Consumers approved
The fourth-largest consumer market for shoes in the world, Brazilian footwear retail has been experiencing the effects of the new coronavirus, just like all other economic sectors. On the other hand, the movement Um Sapato pelo Brasil helped assert the importance of purchasing shoes manufactured in the country as a way to create jobs, generate income, and promote development for all Brazilians.  And this was positively perceived. 

Rafael Martinez (35), a businessman that lives in the city of São Paulo (in the namesake state), recognizes that he has always been very demanding when purchasing shoes and that he had been under the wrong impression that imported shoes were of better quality.  "The campaign alerted me to the potential of the Brazilian industry, not only for its quality but also for the social role it plays, creating jobs and generating income, favoring the economy of our country," he said.

Public servant Nathalia Paola Oliveira (31), from the city of Porto Alegre (in the state of Rio Grande do Sul), stressed the importance of valuing the national product, which fosters development for Brazilians. She also mentioned that Brazilian shoes owe nothing in terms of quality to imported shoes and that local consumers should be increasingly aware of the fact, especially through campaigns such as Um Sapato pelo Brasil.  "All my shoes are manufactured here, I have always been aware of this. And we know, for example, that many foreigners are passionate about some Brazilian brands, and they are not properly valued here.  This situation needs to change," she concluded.

Besides the footwear brands, the movement was supported by unions, industry organizations, suppliers, and retailers.

 


*Get to know the brands that joined the movement:
Alme
Amaia
Amora84
Amora84
Ana Flex
Andacco
Aniger
Arezzo & Co
Azaleia
Azille
Batatinha BTA
Bebecê
Bem Me Quer Calçados
Bibi
Bischoff Group
BKR Amorella
Blade Footwear
Boaonda®
Bota Brasil
Bottero
Bradok
Byara
Calçados Rubra
Caminar
Capodarte
Capricho Shoes
Carrano
Cecconello
Chiringuitas Ibiza
Clo^^
CNS+
Comfortflex
Conforto
Coratta
Cristofoli
CUP Store
Dakota
Democrata
Di Valentini
Dilly Sports
Diversão Calçados
Doctor Shoes Antistaffa
Donna Carlotta
Dumond
Eléia Calçados
Esposende
Ferracini
Ferricelli Calçados
Fiever
Flib
Gaston
Giulia Domna Shoes
Grendene
Grendene Kids
Grupo Priority
Guilhermina
Invitto
Invoice Calçados
Ipadma
Jorge Bischoff
Juliana Amaral
Kids e Baby Shoes
Kidy
Kildare
Klin
La Femme
La Fitty
Lapa Shoes
Latittude
Linc Calçados 
Loja Soares
Loucos&Santos
Luiza Barcelos
Lynd
Madero
Malu Super Comfort
Marjorie
Marluvas
Mary Jane
Massey
Mironneli 
MITI Shoes
Mormaii Shoes
Mr. Bischoff
Mulher Sofisticada
Neorubber
Nossa Shoes
Olympikus
Opananken Antistress
Pampili
Paquetá Calçados
Paquetá Esportes
Pegada
Perky
Perlatto
Pesh
Petit Cheval
Piccadilly
Plugt
Quinta Valentina
Rafarillo
Ramarim
Redikal
Redmax
Renata Mello
Reserva Go
Sandro Moscoloni
Savelli
Saygon e Syg
Shoetherapy
Sollu Calçados
Sound Kids
Sound Shoes
St. Louise
Star Universe
Starflex 
Stéphanie Classic
Stepsgreen
Sticky Shoes
Street Star
Sugar Shoes
Suzana Santos
Takayama Atelier
Talkflex
Tenis GLK
TH Shoes
Tip Toey Joey
Tweenie
Umbro Brasil
Urbann Boards
Usaflex
Usthemp
Valentina Flats
Variettá
Vera Moreno Calçados
Verofatto
Vero Moc
Via Vip Calçados
Viccini
Vicenza
Vinci Shoes
Vulcabras
Wirth
WorldColors
Zagga
Zatz

* Brands registered in the movement